Top 10 De-Escalation Tips for Health Care Professionals

Every day at the workplace presents new encounters, situations, and challenges for the health care professional. You may find yourself dealing with angry, hostile, or noncompliant behavior every day. Your response to this defensive behavior plays a critical role in determining whether or not the incident will escalate into a crisis situation. These 10 de-escalation tips provide strategies and techniques to help you respond to difficult behavior in the safest, most effective way possible.

  1. Be empathetic and nonjudgmental
  2. Respect personal space
  3. Allow time for decisions
  4. Use nonthreatening nonverbals
  5. Set limits
  6. Focus on feelings
  7. Ignore challenging questions
  8. Avoid overreacting
  9. Choose what you insist upon wisely
  10. Allow silence for reflection

DeEscalation Tips for Health Care

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Nurse Resiliency and Value of Stress Reduction

Former ONE-DC President, Denice Boehm, presented at the DCHA’s Patient Safety & Quality Summit. She spoke about nursing resiliency and the value of stress reduction, particularly within the context of the pandemic.

 

AONL COVID-19 Longitudinal Study

This report and accompanying PowerPoint presentation focuses on the following research goals:

  • Nursing leadership pulse check
  • Identify key challenges
  • Identify changes in leadership perception
  • Leverage nursing leadership advocacy support

The story from July 2020 has changed including the emotional impact, financial challenges, levels of support and points of care.

 

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